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Ethan Burris

Ethan Burris is an Associate Professor at McCombs School of Business at University of Texas in Austin. He is an expert on human behaviors that impact the creativity, productivity, and innovative idea sharing of organizational teams. His research has been included in several top psychology and management journals, including the Academy of Management Journal and the Journal of Applied Psychology, as well as in the Harvard Business Review and the Houston Chronicle.
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Recent Posts

3 Managerial Traits That Sustain a Culture of Continuous Improvement

Posted by Ethan Burris

Aug 21, 2015 7:07:00 AM

Imagine that one of your employees is struggling with something at work. Maybe she has a process that’s mind numbingly inefficient, or regularly performs a workaround to accommodate a supply shortage. Maybe she’s having trouble balancing her work with her personal life; perhaps she’s a nursing mother, and she doesn’t have access to a private, comfortable place to pump. Whatever her problem is, imagine that it’s significantly decreasing her satisfaction and engagement with her job.

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Quitting Before Leaving: Causes of Decreased Employee Engagement

Posted by Ethan Burris

Jul 30, 2015 2:08:00 PM

As a leader, you are probably interested in organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), even if you aren’t familiar with the term. These are the behaviors which aim to improve the organization, but which are not – and cannot – be regulated by formal job descriptions or contracts. Basically, think of all the things you are required to do; OCBs are all the extra things that are “above and beyond.” These include helping teammates, staying late to complete assignments, proactively making changes for the better, and speaking up with suggestions for improvement. These promote a stable work environment and challenge the status quo, both of which are vital to organizational learning.

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Topics: Employee Engagement

Recent Posts