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DMAIC: A Powerful Tool for Problem Solving

Posted by Kade Jansson

Oct 12, 2017 11:02:25 AM

DMAIC (Deh-May-Ick) is one of the most important tools in the continuous improvement toolbox. It is most closely associated with the Six Sigma methodology, but it is also used by those who practice Lean or don’t subscribe to a methodology at all. The reason that DMAIC is so popular is that it is a problem-solving framework that takes teams from discovering root causes to long-term, stable standard work. It is a repeatable process that employees can learn to apply to any number of process problems.  

DMAIC stands for Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control.  Motorola is credited with bringing it to prominence, although it was essentially an evolution of the improvement methodology used by Toyota.

A deeper dive reveals why it works so well.

 

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Topics: Six Sigma, DMAIC

The 5 Worst Things You Could Do When Using the DMAIC Framework

Posted by Kade Jansson

Apr 5, 2017 7:17:00 AM

If you’re using the Six Sigma methodology to create change and sustain continuous improvement in your organization, you’re likely using, or will use, DMAIC (pronounced "de-may-ick"). DMAIC is an acronym that outlines a framework for identifying and challenging sources of waste, poor quality, and inefficient processes and then looking for opportunities for improvement.

What is DMAIC?

  • Define:  Outline the goals of the project and the customer deliverables so that it’s known when success has been reached.
  • Measure:  Assess the current performance of the process to use as a quantified baseline for measurement later.
  • Analyze:  Uncover the defects to find the root cause of the problem(s) so that you can target improvement work.
  • Improve:  Identify, implement, and test a solution to resolving the problem(s).
  • Control:  Determine if the improvement can be maintained, or if it can be used to improve the performance of other processes.

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Common DMAIC Mistakes

DMAIC is best used when an existing product or process fails to meet performance expectations or otherwise leaves customers unsatisfied. You can read more about what DMAIC is and about steps involved on our blog, but for those of you who are finding DMAIC challenging you may want to check your organization isn’t making these five big DMAIC mistakes.

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Topics: DMAIC

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