<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=749646578535459&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

KaiNexus Blog

Everything Continuous Improvement

Subscribe

Brianna Hudock

Find me on:

Recent Posts

6 Steps to Improvement in Manufacturing

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Dec 1, 2020 3:59:48 PM

One of the most important responsibilities of managers in manufacturing environments is to contain costs. The most obvious cost to eliminate is the cost of low quality. Defective products and lost labor hours add no value to the customer and represent a significant strain on the organization.

To eliminate the waste of low quality, a strategic approach to improvement is essential. Here are five steps that support quality improvement in a meaningful, sustainable way.

Read More

Topics: Quality, Improvement Culture, Spread Continuous Improvement, Improvement Process

Improvement Culture: 4 Signs of Trouble

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Oct 14, 2020 10:30:00 AM

Modern leaders are fortunate to have a host of proven continuous improvement tools like DMAIC, Standard Work, kanban, Hoshin Kanri, and more. We owe a lot to those who pioneered Lean management and other methodologies that bake quality improvement into daily business processes.

These tools are available to everyone, but not all organizations that strive for improvement achieve it. Why is that?

It's because the tools alone are not enough. The deciding factor in whether or not CI can be achieved is based on the people. Results depend on how people think, what they believe is possible, and the decisions they make big and small. In short, without a culture that supports improvement, success is unlikely.

If you've struggled to get what you want out of your improvement program, culture is the first place to look for both problems and solutions. Here are four signs that a culture isn't conducive to improvement.

Read More

Topics: Leadership, Improvement Culture

The 5 M’s of Kaizen for Managers

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Aug 18, 2020 10:44:00 AM

We often describe Kaizen as a way of looking at the world rather than a prescription for how to achieve positive change. Kaizen thinkers seek to make small changes to operations daily in search of higher quality, more efficiency, and less waste. But because the concept of Kaizen is so philosophical, it can be a challenge for people new to the idea to understand what it means in practical terms.

Related: What is Kaizen?

One useful tool for training managers to adopt the Kaizen mindset is called the 5 M’s. By consistently examining the 5 M’s, managers will be able to recognize when something in a process is not working and improve efficiency and profitability. This model can be used for risk mitigation, addressing safety issues, and improving quality. It can be used right alongside other Kaizen techniques such as the 5 Whys, 5S, and Gemba walks.

The 5 M’s are:

Read More

Topics: Kaizen, Leadership

When Zero is the Only Acceptable Goal

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Jun 23, 2020 1:30:00 PM

The Utah Department of Transportation has an audacious goal. Zero fatalities. According to its website, “Zero Fatalities is all about eliminating fatalities on our roadways. Some people may think zero is an impossible goal, but when it comes to your life or the lives of your friends and family, what other number would be acceptable?”

Has the department reached its goal? No. There have been 82 traffic fatalities in Utah this year as of writing this. Does that mean they should revise the target for the second half of the year? Maybe the goal should be to cut fatalities by 10%? Of course not, that would be absurd. Zero remains the only reasonable goal.

While your organization may not be involved in life or death matters, the quest for zero may still be relevant. Zero defects, zero safety incidents, zero rework, zero waste, zero customer complaints: these all may seem like impossible goals. But how many defects, accidents, do-overs, or angry customers are ok? Zero.

The State of Utah didn’t just set a lofty goal. They have a three-step approach to getting there. While the framework is simple, it is a great way to think about improving any outcome. They call it “The Three E’s of Emphasis.”

Read More

Topics: Improvement Process

The Complete Quality Improvement Software Checklist

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Apr 29, 2020 10:00:00 AM


Most people don’t purchase quality improvement software solutions very often. So if you are in the market for a way to support your QI efforts, but you’re not sure where to begin, you are not alone. Fortunately, you’ve come to the right place.

This post will detail all of the features that you should expect to find in a quality improvement platform. Not all of them will be essential for your current needs, but if you select a solution that covers all the bases, you’ll be in great shape as your organization changes over time.



Read More

Topics: Software, Quality, Continuous Improvement Software

Leadership Lessons from Motivational Interviewing

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Dec 18, 2019 12:32:05 PM

One of the things we love doing most is providing the continuous improvement community with more resources and opportunities to learn. Our webinar series aims to do precisely that by bringing in experts, improvement professionals, and front-line process operators to share their experiences and knowledge.

This post is a recap of one of our most popular webinars ever. Mark Graban, our senior advisor, was delighted to host Mark Valenti. (You can never have too many Marks on a webinar, but you can in a webinar recap. To make it easy to tell who is speaking, and keep the informal tone of the presentation, I'll call them Mark Valenti just Mark, and Mark Graban, Mark G.)

Read More

Topics: Webinars

What Do Lean and Improv Have In Common?

Posted by Brianna Hudock

Dec 6, 2019 8:11:00 AM

“Yes, and” - A shorthand phrase that means to first accept the current reality as it is, and then to make a decision and build something based on this reality. Although this concept might sound very similar to certain aspects of Lean, it is actually the backbone of improv comedy. Improv comedy is the art of performing something invented on the spot. Although it can sound rather intimidating, “yes, and” sets a foundation of trust so that performers can become comfortable enough performing with one another even when they have no idea what’s going to happen next. 

Read More

Recent Posts